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FlyTF


NAR Molecular Biology Database Collection entry number 1158
Pfreundt, U.1,2, James, D.1, Tweedie, S.2, Wilson, D.3, Teichmann, S.3, and Adryan, B.1,2
1Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QR, UK
2Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK
3Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH, UK
Contact ba255@cam.ac.uk

Database Description

FlyTF (v2) is a manually curated catalogue of Drosophila site-specific transcription factors (TFs). It integrates proteins identified as DNA-binding TFs by computational prediction based on structural domain assignments, and experimentally verified TFs from the literature.

Recent Developments

The manual classification of TFs in the initial version of FlyTF that concentrated primarily on the DNA-binding characteristics of the proteins has now been extended to a more fine-grained annotation of both DNA-binding and regulatory properties in the new release. Further, the data is now provided through the InterMine web interface, which enables powerful queries and customisable output in a variety of formats. We encourage the Drosophila community to provide feedback on our annotations.

Acknowledgements

We thank Nick Brown and Steven Marygold at FlyBase for enabling U.P. to participate in this collaboration. U.P. was supported through the FlyBase grant (National Human Genome Research Institute at the U.S. National Institutes of Health #P41 HG000739), D.J. was supported through an EPSRC MPhil studentship, D.W. and S.T. are supported by the Medical Research Council, and B.A. is a Royal Society University Research Fellow.

References

1. Adryan, B. and Teichmann, S.A. (2006) FlyTF: a systematic review of site-specific transcription factors in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatics 22(12), 1532
2. Adryan, B. and Teichmann, S.A. (2007) Computational Identification of Site-Specific Transcription Factors in Drosophila. Fly 1(3), 142


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