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euGenes


NAR Molecular Biology Database Collection entry number 396
Gilbert, D.
Genome Informatics Lab, Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA

Database Description

euGenes is a genome information system and database that provides a common summary of eukaryote genes and genomes, at http://eugenes.org/. Popular genomes summarized include human, mouse, rat, fruitfly, mosquito, Caenorhabditis elegans worm, Saccharomyces yeast, Arabidopsis mustard weed and zebrafish. This information, automatically updated from source databases, offers several features useful to bioscientists looking for gene relationships across organisms. The database describes over 200,000 genes, using reference database gene names and IDs, along with BLAST homologies and associations with molecular functions, cell locations and biological processes. Included are whole-genome maps locating millions of features and molecular data, and options to retrieve sequences, and run BLAST comparisions. Search and retrieval of genome data is easy and quick, allowing one to ask combined questions of sequence features, protein functions and other gene attributes, and fetch results as web reports or bulk database formats, for integration in other projects such as gene expression databases.

Recent Developments

Year 2003 updates include addition of mosquito and rat genomes. Addition of rice, Fugu, chimpanzee, Daphnia and other eukaryote genomes is in progress. Extended flexibility of euGenes is available now with redesign as a common, replicable genome information system Argos (http://eugenes.org/argos/). It can be copied and run on scientists's Unix computers, including MacOSX, Linux and Solaris, with minimal effort and knowledge of Unix. Argos includes common genome tools and software such as NCBI web BLAST, and Generic Model Organism Database (http://www.gmod.org/) tools. It now forms the basis for euGenes, FlyBase (http://flybase.net/) genome database, and new genome systems such as Daphnia pulex (http://eugenes.org/daphnia/)


Go to the abstract in the NAR 2002 Database Issue.
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