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pSTIING


NAR Molecular Biology Database Collection entry number 858
Ng A., Bursteinas B., Gao Q., Mollison E. and Zvelebil M.

Database Description

pSTIING (Protein Signalling, Transcriptional Interactions & Inflammation Networks Gateway) is a publicly accessible web-based application and knowledgebase featuring more than 65,000 distinct molecular associations (comprising protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-small molecule interactions and transcriptional regulatory associations), ligand-receptor-cell type information and signal transduction modules. It has a major focus on regulatory networks relevant to chronic inflammation, cell migration and cancer. The web application and interface provide graphical representations of networks allowing users to combine and extend transcriptional regulatory and signalling modules, infer molecular interactions across species, and explore networks via protein domains/motifs, gene ontology (GO) annotations and human diseases. pSTIING also supports the direct cross-correlation of experimental results with interaction information in the knowledgebase via the CLADIST tool associated with pSTIING, which currently analyses and clusters gene expression, proteomic and phenotypic datasets. This allows the contextual projection of co-expression patterns onto prior network information, facilitating the identification of functional modules in physiologically relevant systems. pSTIING-CLADIST is available at http://pstiing.licr.org/

Acknowledgements

pSTIING is a project within the MAIN-NOE (Network of Excellence for Cell migration in Chronic Inflammation) consortium supported and funded by the EU 6th Framework Programme (EU project number: FP6-502935).

References

1. Ng A., Bursteinas B., Gao Q., Mollison E. and Zvelebil M.(2006). pSTIING: a 'systems' approach towards integrating signalling pathways, interaction and transcriptional regulatory networks in inflammation and cancer. Nucleic Acids Research 33(1), in press.


Go to the abstract in the NAR 2006 Database Issue.
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