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call for submissions

AAEA’s New Journal: Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy


AAEA is re-launching the Review of Agricultural Economics (RAE) under a new journal name, Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy (AEPP). The change will become effective with the first issue of 2010. Interested authors can now submit manuscripts for consideration for AEPP by visiting the online submission site.

AEPP’s objectives are to stimulate insights and promote cross-fertilization among sub-fields of agricultural and applied economics to:

  • Broaden understanding
  • Foster integrative research
  • Increase knowledge and communication among analysts, researchers, and policymakers about the impacts of public policy.

In each issue of the journal, at least two Featured Articles will focus on selected themes of interest, alongside which will be published Submitted Articles. Featured Articles will synthesize and integrate existing research relating to a theme, while Submitted Articles will present original research results with an emphasis on drawing out future research and policy implications.

  • Introduce topics in a way that will attract, and be understandable to, readers from a wide variety of backgrounds.
  • State arguments and results in English rather than math where possible. When mathematics is used, provide verbal explanations of mathematical results that are informative to broad audiences.
  • Relegate substantial mathematics to an appendix that need not be digested in order to understand the article.
  • Emphasize drawing out the practical (e.g., policy-relevant) implications with clear intuitive and graphical explanations.

Submitted Articles
AEPP will publish submitted articles, subject to a double-blind review process, that meet high quality standards for scholarly publication in applied economics. Submitted articles should accomplish at least one of the following purposes:

  • Present original research emphasizing practical implications for public policy
  • Present new economic perspectives by synthesizing and integrating established literature
  • Elucidate the practical policy implications of existing research
  • Present empirical comparisons of competing theories, explanations, or approaches
  • Derive and elucidate the implications of existing literature for future research directions.

AEPP will publish contributions to applied economics across a range of issues:

  • Agriculture
  • Development
  • Education
  • Energy
  • Environment
  • Finance
  • Food and consumer issues
  • Health
  • Natural resources
  • Regional and rural issues

AEPP will present high-quality research in a forum that is informative to broad audiences of agricultural and applied economists, including those outside as well as inside academia and those not immediately conversant with the subject matter of the articles. Some ways for authors to achieve this are:

  • Introduce topics in a way that will attract, and be understandable to, readers from a wide variety of backgrounds.
  • State arguments and results in English rather than math where possible. When mathematics is used, provide verbal explanations of mathematical results that are informative to broad audiences.
  • Relegate substantial mathematics to an appendix that need not be digested in order to understand the article.
  • Emphasize drawing out the practical (e.g., policy-relevant) implications with clear intuitive and graphical explanations.

Featured Articles
Featured Articles will be commissioned, though proposals of potential topics are encouraged. If you are interested in proposing a topic for a Featured Article, please contact Spiro Stefanou at AEPPEditor@gmail.com.

The basic focus of any Featured Article in AEPP should be on understanding a central idea within the subject matter of the journal that will be of broad interest, and that is either in dispute among researchers and/or has major implications for public policy. The intended audience of each Featured Article includes not only academic researchers, but the broader audience of all agricultural and applied economists as well as others interested in economic issues working outside academia in government agencies, NGOs, and “think-tanks”.