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General Journal Policies

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Editorial independence
Advertising and sponsorship
Disclaimers
Copyright
Page charges
Database deposition
Feedback and complaints

EDITORIAL INDEPENDENCE

The British Society for Rheumatology adopts the Word Association of Medical Editors’ definition of editorial freedom. The Editor has the final authority for determining the editorial content of the Journal and the Society and Publisher will not interfere or influence the Editor’s decision in any way.

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ADVERTISING AND SPONSORSHIP

Rheumatology displays adverts in both the print issue and online. It does not allow advertising or sponsorship to influence editorial decisions. The content of the Journal is independently decided from the advertising planned for the issue and is not made available to advertisers prior to its publication. The Journal publishes online banners on the Journal homepage and at the top of HTML articles. Inadvertently, an advertisement may coincide with an article on a related subject, but it is purely coincidental. It does not imply that the advertisement is endorsed by the Journal, the article or the authors of the article.

Advertisement in the Journal is neither a guarantee nor an endorsement by the British Society for Rheumatology, the Editors, the Editorial Board or Oxford University Press.

The Journal will publish adverts that are legal and appropriate for the Journal. All adverts are approved by the Editorial Office before publication. Advertisements must be factually accurate and should not be misleading or offensive. No advertiser is given exclusive rights to advertise on the website or in the Journal. The Editorial Office reserves the right to decline any advertisement.

All advertisements must meet the appropriate legal requirements (for example Food and Drug Administration regulations) as per the guidelines outlined in Code of Practice for the Pharmaceutical Industry. It is the advertiser’s responsibility to adhere to appropriate legal requirements and regulations.

The Journal occasionally publishes supplementary issues, which are peer reviewed. The editorial process is independent of funders or advertisers.

If you have any comments about an advertisement in the Journal, please contact the Managing Editor.

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DISCLAIMERS

Material disclaimer

The opinions expressed in Rheumatology are those of the authors and contributors, and do not necessarily reflect those of the British Society for Rheumatology, the Editors, the Editorial Board, Oxford University Press or the organization to which the authors are affiliated.

Drug disclaimer

The mention of trade names, commercial products or organizations, and the inclusion of advertisements in the Journal does not imply endorsement by the British Society for Rheumatology, the Editors, the Editorial Board, Oxford University Press or the organization to which the authors are affiliated.

The Editors and publishers have taken all reasonable precautions to verify drug names and doses, the results of experimental work and clinical findings published in the Journal.

The ultimate responsibility for the use and dosage of drugs mentioned in the Journal and in the interpretation of published material lies with the medical practitioner, and the Editors and publishers cannot accept liability for damages arising from any errors or omissions in the Journal. Please inform the Editor of any errors.

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COPYRIGHT

It is a condition of publication in Rheumatology that authors grant an exclusive licence to the Journal, published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

This licence ensures that requests from third parties to reproduce articles are handled efficiently and consistently and will also allow the article to be as widely disseminated as possible. In assigning the licence, authors may use their own material in other publications provided that the Journal is acknowledged as the original place of publication, and Oxford University Press is notified in writing and in advance.

The Licence agreement must be completed online and the publisher will send a link to the online licensing system to the corresponding author once the paper has been accepted and sent through to production.

Information about the New Creative Commons licence can be found here.

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PAGE CHARGES

There is a page limit of 9 printed pages per article. For all pages over this limit the authors will be charged £95 (~US$180) per additional page.

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DATABASE DEPOSITION

The Journal allows authors to deposit their papers on preprint servers and their data in public databases.

Databases that aggregate published data for the use of the scientific community are supported by Rheumatology. Before publication, large data sets (including atomic coordinates or electron microscopy maps for macromolecular structures, DNA or protein sequences, and microarray data) must be deposited in an approved database and an accession number provided for inclusion in the published article.

DNA and protein sequence data

DNA and protein sequences must be deposited in one of the following approved databases: GenBank or other members of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (EMBL or DDBJ) and SWISS-PROT.

Macromolecular structure data

Atomic coordinates and structure factor files from X-ray structural studies or an ensemble of atomic coordinates from NMR structural studies must be deposited and released at the time of publication. Three-dimensional maps derived by electron microscopy and coordinate data derived from these maps must also be deposited. Approved databases are the Worldwide Protein Data Bank, BioMag Res Bank, and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (MSD-EBI).

Microarray data

Microarray data should be presented in MIAME compliant standard format as proposed by the Microarray Gene Expression Data Society. ArrayExpress and Gene Expression Omnibus are approved databases for the deposition of microarray data.

Rheumatology would like to acknowledge Science for allowing the Journal to base its policy on their published database deposition policy.

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FEEDBACK AND COMPLAINTS

Our commitment to you

Rheumatology is committed to providing high-quality services. Our customers are our authors, reviewers, readers, Editors, the public and those agencies and individuals who are connected to the Journal through similar interests, aims and objectives.

We value your feedback and want to hear from you about suggestions, complaints or even if it is just a general comment.

How the system works

At Rheumatology the Managing Editor acts as the Journal’s feedback and complaints coordinator, who is responsible for making sure that all feedback and complaints are logged and followed up, and who will monitor points raised to make sure that they are being dealt with.

How to make a complaint

If you are not happy about the service that you receive, it is usually best to let the person who is providing the service know, either by telephone, letter, e-mail or in person. If you do not know who to contact you can write directly to:

Managing Editor
Rheumatology
The British Society for Rheumatology
Bride House
18–20 Bride Lane
London
EC4Y 8EE
UK
Or e-mail

The Managing Editor will log the complaint and ensure that it is assigned to the appropriate person. You will receive a confirmation letter or e-mail within ten working days confirming that the complaint has been received.

If you are not satisfied with the outcome

After investigation, you will receive a formal response to your complaint and this will normally be within ten working days of the acknowledgement of your complaint. If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the complaint, let the Managing Editor know.

The complaint will be progressed so that the complaints committee can investigate for you. The complaints committee consists of the BSR Chief Executive, BSR President and the Chair of the Heberden Committee. The BSR President will write to you with the results of their investigation normally within ten working days of any referral.

How to make a complaint against the Editor

Rheumatology is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and consequently the Editor of Rheumatology has agreed to abide by the guidelines set out in the COPE Code of conduct for Editors of biomedical journals: a suggested code of conduct for Editors to guide them towards being fair to authors, researchers and readers.

Complaints against the Editor should be made directly to the Editor in writing. If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the complaint then let the Editor know. The complaint will be progressed so that the complaints committee can investigate further.

The complaints committee consists of the BSR Chief Executive, BSR President and the Chair of the Heberden Committee. The BSR President will write to you with the result of their investigation normally within ten working days of any referral.

If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the complaints committee, or if the complaints committee fails to resolve the issue, then the complaint can be referred to the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Only complaints that have been through the Journal’s complaint’s procedure can be referred to COPE. Please consult the COPE website for details of the complaints procedure (http://www.publicationethics.org.uk).

Acting on the results

We will do everything that we can to put things right and will review our procedures where necessary to stop the problem recurring.

Giving positive feedback

We hope you agree that most of the time we do provide a good quality service. We value any feedback from our customers and would also like to hear from you.

Our objective is to provide a quality service unparalleled by comparable journals. To do that, we rely on organisational learning directly based on your experiences. If you want to give us feedback, write to the Managing Editor, as above, marking your letter as ‘Feedback’ or e-mail us your feedback.

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