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Instructions to Authors

SCOPE

The Journal of Chromatographic Science is devoted to the dissemination of information concerning all methods of chromatographic analysis. The standard manuscript is a description of recent original research that covers any or all phases of a specific separation problem, principle, or method. Manuscripts which have a high degree of novelty and fundamental significance to the field of separation science are particularly encouraged. It is expected the authors will clearly state in the Introduction how their method compares in some markedly new and improved way to previous published related methods. Analytical performance characteristics of new methods including sensitivity, tested limits of detection or quantification, accuracy, precision, and specificity should be provided. Manuscripts which describe a straightforward extension of a known analytical method or an application to a previously analyzed and/or uncomplicated sample matrix will not normally be reviewed favorably.

In addition to regular research papers, the following types of manuscripts will be considered. “Review Articles” can be submitted and will be considered using our normal review process. However, authors should first send an Abstract of their proposed review article to one of the co-editors for approval. This Abstract should clearly justify the need for this review and also outline the content. Once approved, these contributions should be similar in length to a research paper but the organization of the sections is up to the author. The use of numbered sub-headings is strongly encouraged. Figures and tables should be part of the article however permission for use must be obtained from the appropriate publisher. “Technical Notes” are brief disclosures of new chromatographic concepts or practices or brief descriptions of novel apparatuses or techniques. “Expedited Papers” are those determined by our editors and reviewers to be of interest to most chromatographers and their publication will be accelerated. General comments on the content of the Journal are appropriate for “Letters to the Editor,” as are comments on the work of specific authors, in which case the authors will be allowed to reply. The editors encourage readers to communicate questions and criticisms inspired by the Journal.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

At the point of submission, Journal of Chromatographic Science policy requires that each author reveal any financial interests or connections, direct or indirect, or other situations that might raise the question of bias in the work reported or the conclusions, implications, or opinions stated—including pertinent commercial or other sources of funding for the individual author(s) or for the associated department(s) or organization(s), personal relationships, or direct academic competition. When considering whether you should declare a conflicting interest or connection please consider the conflict of interest test: Is there any arrangement that would embarrass you or any of your co-authors if it was to emerge after publication and you had not declared it?

As part of the online submission process, Corresponding authors are required to confirm whether they or their co-authors have any conflicts of interest to declare, and to provide details of these. It is the Corresponding author’s responsibility to ensure that all authors adhere to this policy.

Examples of potential conflicts of interest which should be disclosed include employment, consultancies, stock ownership, honoraria, paid expert testimony, patent applications/registrations, and grants or other funding. Potential conflicts of interest should be disclosed at the earliest possible stage and if the manuscript is accepted, conflict of interest information will be communicated in a statement in the published paper.

LANGUAGE EDITING PRE-SUBMISSION

OUP offers pre-submission language editing through Oxford Language Editing, a service for researchers all over the world. Language editing, particularly if English is not your first language, can be used to ensure that the academic content of your paper is fully understood by the journal editors and reviewers. Visit http://www.oxfordlanguageediting.com to find out more about the freelance editors available and the different services offered. Please note that edited manuscripts will still need to undergo peer-review by the journal.

SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPTS

Submission of a paper to this journal implies that the manuscript has not been published in, or submitted to, any other journal and that the author(s) have obtained appropriate permission to use data obtained for and contained in the manuscript. Previous presentation at professional meetings should be mentioned in a footnote. All manuscripts should be composed of original text that has not been published before; manuscripts may be subjected to a plagiarism check using iThenticate© software.

General Points

Manuscripts should be prepared carefully according to the The American Chemical Society’s ACS Style Guide: A Manual for Authors and Editors, 2nd ed. American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., 1997. The most important rule of good style is to be consistent throughout a manuscript. Manuscripts accepted for publication must conform strictly to these style guidelines, and the editor reserves the right to make appropriate changes. If a manuscript is not in suitably usable condition, the editor reserves the right to postpone or refuse publication or request retyping.

Manuscripts should be in their final form when they are submitted, so that proofs require only correction of typographical errors. All parts of the manuscript (except figures) should be double-spaced throughout and should be in a word-processing file.

Sections of the manuscript

Manuscripts should be subdivided into the following sequence of sections:

  • Title page
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • Introduction
  • Experimental
  • Instrumentation and Reagents
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • Funding
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Tables
  • Legends to figures
  • Figures (if not in a graphic-type file like PDF, tif, eps, etc.)
  • Supplementary data

The text should describe the equipment and method(s) in sufficient detail to permit duplication of the results.

Language

Manuscripts must be clearly and concisely written in English. The Editors reserve the right to reject without review those that cannot adequately be assessed because of a poor standard of English. Authors whose first language is not English are encouraged to have their manuscript checked by a native English speaker. If you have difficulty with this you can obtain further help and information here.

Title

No longer than 10 words; also to include country where research undertaken in title (if relevant).

Key words

Please include a minimum of two words “key words” to aid literature searching, and a maximum of five.

Abstracts

The second page of every manuscript must contain only the Abstract, which should not exceed 200 words. The Abstract should be comprehensible to readers before they have read the paper, and abbreviations and reference citations should be avoided. It is essential that the Abstract clearly summarizes the objective(s), methods, results (at least some quantitative data), and conclusion(s).

Word count

Manuscript length not to exceed 7000 words of text, allowing approximately:

  • 5800 words for body of text
  • 200 words for abstract
  • 1000 words for references

Variations can be made to the length of these individual sections but the total word count must not exceed 7000 words. Please state clearly on the manuscript the breakdown of the total word count.

Tables

Authors should provide tables in editable formats, such as word and excel.

Data should not be represented in both table and figure form. In addition, straight line calibration plots will generally not be published; this data can be summarized as a linear least squares regression analysis equation with n= number of points, range of data, and correlation coefficient.

Tables should be typed on separate sheets and numbered consecutively with roman numerals (i.e., Table I, Table II, etc). Tables should be self-explanatory and include a brief descriptive title. Tables can include note(s) that appear below the table. Note(s) usually include full definitions of abbreviations that appear in the table. Footnotes are also acceptable and are indicated by lowercase letters. But footnotes should not include extensive experimental detail. Tables must be called out in the text.

Supplementary Information

You are encouraged to include figures and tables in Supplementary Information. Co-editors will often request excessive figures such as linear calibration plots and multiple tables such as those describing precision be moved to Supplementary Information. Please label the figures in the Supplementary Information as S1, S2, S3, etc. and refer to them as such in the manuscript text.

Correspondence

The Editorial Office will correspond directly with authors on the acceptability of their papers.

Unique submissions

Authors may not submit manuscripts that are under consideration for publication elsewhere.

Online submission

Manuscripts must be submitted online via the online submission system http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jcs. Please see further submission details below.

Review Procedure

All submissions except those sent as “Letters to the Editor” are subject to review by two or more independent reviewers selected by the editor(s). Authors may suggest reviewers. The reviewers are asked to indicate the paper’s degree of interest to JCS readers and whether the manuscript should be published without change; with major or minor revision; or not at all. A request for a revised re-submission of a rejected manuscript may also be made by the editor.

Publication Time

Manuscripts requiring only minor revision may be published within six months of submission. The average time before publication is six months after a manuscript or its revision is deemed acceptable. If possible, manuscripts accepted as “Expedited Papers” are published within eight weeks.

Chromatography Problem Solving and Troubleshooting

The editors welcome questions from readers regarding equipment and application techniques. Questions should be emailed to jcs.editorialoffice@oup.com, and should include a name and affiliation.

Preparing Documents for Submission

  • Enter text in the style and order of the Journal (see "References" section below).
  • Insert figure captions and tables at the end of the file.
  • Save any tables, diagrams, figures, graphs or illustrations generated electronically as separate files and not embedded into the text file. Tables must be in editable format (e.g. Excel). Figures can be in editable or image format.
  • Type headings in the style of the Journal.
  • Where possible use Times for the text font and Symbol for the Greek and special characters. Please use the word processing formatting features to indicate Bold, Italic, Greek, Math, Superscript and Subscript characters.

Once your manuscript is ready for submission, please follow the online submission instructions here.

Equations

Number equations consecutively using Arabic numerals. Place superscripts and subscripts accurately, indicate capital letters and italics, and distinguish between characters that may be confused—e.g., number one and lower-case “L” or zero and upper-case “O”. Avoid superscripts that may be confused with exponents. Variables should be in italics.

Abbreviations and Units

Any word you intend to abbreviate should be spelled out at first occurrence. The first spelled out occurrence should be followed by the abbreviation in parenthesis. Standard units of measurement may be used without definition in the body of the paper. The international system of units (IUPAC) is the preferred system for expressing measurements. Use abbreviations as given in The ACS Style Guide or the International Serials Catalogue.

Safety Considerations


Detailed safety warnings about any procedures that are hazardous and use of any toxic chemicals in significant amounts must be included in the Experimental section (not Supplementary Materials) of the manuscript. Procedures requiring special precautions must be described in enough detail so that workers in the laboratory repeating the experiments can take appropriate safety measures. If appropriate for unusual chemicals, procedures and references describing their ultimate disposal should be included. Use of significantly large amounts of cancer causing chemicals such as benzene may warrant rejection of the manuscript. The use of chlorinated solvents (which are considered cancer suspect agents) for extraction or as a chromatography mobile phase component is discouraged.

Figure/Table Permissions

In order to reproduce any third party material, including figures or tables, in an article authors must obtain permission from the copyright holder and be compliant with any requirements the copyright holder may have pertaining to this reuse.

When seeking to reproduce any kind of third party material authors should request the following:

(i) non-exclusive rights to reproduce the material in the specified article and journal;
(ii) electronic rights, preferably for use in any form or medium;
(iii) the right to use the material for the life of the work; and
(iv) world-wide English-language rights.

Further guidelines on clearing permissions can be found at: http://www.oxfordjournals.org/access_purchase/permissions_guidelines.doc.

Authors should also include a statement indicating that permission has been obtained in the relevant legend/footnote and provide the Editorial Office with copies of any relevant paperwork.

A template permissions request letter can be found at the end of the above document.

Figure Submission

1. Figure Types

Line Art
Line art has sharp, clean lines and geometrical shapes against a white background. Line art is typically used for tables, charts, graphs, and gene sequences. You can use a program like Illustrator to create high-quality line art. A minimum resolution of 300 ppi will maintain the crisp edges of the lines and shapes.
• Format: TIFF or EPS
• Minimum Resolution: 300 ppi

Grayscale
Grayscale figures contain varying tones of black and white. They contain no color, so grayscale is synonymous with "black and white." The gray scale is divided into 256 sections with black at 0 and white at 255. Software for preparation of grayscale art includes Photoshop.
• Format: TIFF or EPS
• Minimum Resolution: 300 ppi

Halftones
The best example of a halftone is a photograph, but halftones include any image that uses continuous shading or blending of colors or grays, such as gels, stains, microarrays, brain scans, and molecular structures. To prepare and manipulate halftone images, use Photoshop or a comparable photo-editing program.
• Format: TIFF
• Minimum Resolution: 300 ppi

Combination Figures
Combination figures contain two or more types of images, for example, a halftone figure containing text. You should embed the images, group the objects, or flatten the layers, and flatten transparencies before saving as TIFF at a minimum of 300 ppi.
• Format: TIFF
• Minimum Resolution: 300 ppi

Convert PowerPoint Files to High-Resolution TIFFs

Caution: Do not add artwork to your PowerPoint slides by copying from another application and then pasting into PowerPoint. Your figures will be downsampled to screen resolution. Instead use Insert > Picture > From File.

Caution: Do not use File > Save as > TIFF. This will result in a low-resolution, poor-quality figure.

Windows 98, XP, Vista and PowerPoint 2003 or 2007:

Step I: Convert PowerPoint File to PDF
There are two possible ways to create PDFs from PowerPoint files: use the Adobe PDF menu in some versions of PowerPoint, or create a PDF via the Print command.
1. Open your file in PowerPoint. From the Adobe PDF menu, select Change Conversion Settings. The PDFMaker Settings dialog displays.
2. From the Conversion settings dropdown menu, select Press Quality. Uncheck View Adobe PDF result. Click OK.
3. From the Adobe PDF menu, select Convert to Adobe PDF. You will be asked to save the PDF file to a location of your choosing.
4. Click OK.

– OR -
1. Open your file in PowerPoint.
2. Select Print from the File dropdown menu.
3. Select the Adobe PDF (or similar driver) in the Printer Name window.
4. Click Properties. Change the Default Settings pull-down to Press Quality. Uncheck the "View Adobe PDF results" box if you don't want Acrobat to launch.
5. Click OK, then click OK. Pick where the PDF will be created, and click Save. Note: If your PowerPoint file contains figures on multiple slides, print each slide to a separate PDF (if you do this, skip ahead to Step III). Alternately, you can create one PDF file and then use Adobe Acrobat to separate the figures/slides into individual files, as detailed in Step II.

Step II: Convert Multi-Page PDF File to Individual Files
1. Using Adobe Acrobat Standard, open the PDF file that you created in Step 1. From the Document menu, select Pages and then Extract. The Extract Page dialog box displays.
2. Enter the page numbers in the To and From fields and then select the Delete Pages checkbox. Checking this box will delete the page that you entered in the To and From fields from the PDF file.
3. Click OK. The page that you specify in the previous step is now shown in Acrobat.
4. From the File menu, select save and enter the file name (e.g., Figure 1) for the extracted page and then click OK.
5. Repeat this process until a separate file is created for each figure/slide.

Step III: Convert Individual PDF Files to TIFFs

In Photoshop:
1. File→Open the PDF. You will need to do this one page at a time. Make sure you're importing it at 300ppi, RGB.
2. Use the Crop Tool (fifth from the top of the toolbar) to select an area close to the borders of your image. Hit Enter to apply the crop.
3. Layer→Flatten Image
4. Image→Image Size. Uncheck the Resample Image checkbox. If the Width is over 17.35cm, type 17.35 in the Width box (17.35cm is our maximum allowable width for figures). The Resolution will go up automatically as the Width decreases. If the resolution does not hit 300 when you make the Width 17.35, type 300 in Resolution and as long as Width doesn't go below 8.3cm, everything is fine. Also, the height cannot be more than 23.35. If the Height and Width are within these prescribed limits, no adjustment to your figure size needs to be made.
5. File→Save As. Save as TIFF, Image Compression set to LZW, Pixel Order set to Interleaved, Byte Order set to IBM PC.

In GIMP:
1. File→Open the PDF. You will need to do this one page at a time. Open pages as Images at 300ppi. Click Import.
2. Use the Crop Tool (third row, second from the right, looks like a knife blade) to select an area close to the borders of your image. Hit Enter to apply the crop.

3. Image→Scale Image. Set the units of measurement, in the pull down menu next to Height, to millimeters. If the Width is over 173.5mm, type 173.5 in the Width box (17.35cm is our maximum allowable width for figures) and hit Tab. The new Height of the figure will appear, scaled proportionately to the change in Width. The Width cannot be below 83.0mm, and the height cannot be more than 233.5mm. If the Height and Width are within these prescribed limits, no adjustment to your figure size needs to be made.
4. File→Save As. Click the + sign next to "Select File Type (By Extension)". From the menu that appears, select TIFF. Click Save. Set Compression set to LZW. If you're prompted about layers in the file, select Flatten Image.

In Acrobat Pro:
1. File→Open the PDF
2. If necessary, go Document→Rotate Pages to rotate the document to a horizontal orientation.
3. File→Save As. In the "Save as type" pull-down menu, select TIFF.
4. Click the Settings button on the right-hand side of the Save As dialog box. In the top third, under "File Settings", both Grayscale and Color should be set to LZW. In the bottom third, "Conversion," set Colorspace to Color:RGB, and Resolution to 300ppi. Click OK. Click Save.

Note: PDFs converted to TIFFs in this manner should still be opened in Photoshop or GIMP to crop excess white space, and make sure the figure falls within our maximums and minimums.

Convert Excel or Word Files to High-Resolution TIFFs
Windows 98, XP, Vista and Excel/Word 2003 or 2007:

Step I: Convert Excel/Word File to PDF
There are two possible ways to create PDFs from Excel/Word files: use the Adobe PDF menu in some versions of Excel/Word, or create a PDF via the Print command.

1. Open your file in Excel/Word. From the Adobe PDF menu, select Change Conversion Settings. The PDFMaker Settings dialog displays.
2. From the Conversion settings dropdown menu, select Press Quality. Uncheck View Adobe PDF result. Click OK.
3. From the Adobe PDF menu, select Convert to Adobe PDF. You will be asked to save the PDF file to a location of your choosing.
4. Click OK.

– OR -

1. Open your file in Excel/Word.
2. Select Print from the File dropdown menu.
3. Select the Adobe PDF (or similar driver) in the Printer Name window.
4. Click Properties. Change the Default Settings pull-down to Press Quality. Uncheck the "View Adobe PDF results" box if you don't want Acrobat to launch.
5. Click OK, then click OK. Pick where the PDF will be created, and click Save.

Step II: Convert Individual PDF Files to TIFFs

In Photoshop:

1. File→Open the PDF. You will need to do this one page at a time. Make sure you're importing it at 300ppi, RGB.
2. Use the Crop Tool (fifth from the top of the toolbar) to select an area close to the borders of your image. Hit Enter to apply the crop.
3. Layer→Flatten Image
4. Image→Image Size. Uncheck the Resample Image checkbox. If the Width is over 17.35cm, type 17.35 in the Width box (17.35cm is our maximum allowable width for figures). The Resolution will go up automatically as the Width decreases. If the resolution does not hit 300 when you make the Width 17.35, type 300 in Resolution and as long as Width doesn't go below 8.3cm, everything is fine. Also, the height cannot be more than 23.35. If the Height and Width are within these prescribed limits, no adjustment to your figure size needs to be made.
5. File→Save As. Save as TIFF, Image Compression set to LZW, Pixel Order set to Interleaved, Byte Order set to IBM PC.

Images on disk can be accepted in Adobe PhotoShop compatible formats. Images should be saved in TIFF format. Chromatograms generated by most instruments are not of high enough quality for publication. The signal response versus time data, saved as an ASCII file, can be effectively re-plotted using Origin Pro software (Origin Lab). Plotting chromatograms with Excel is not recommended due to excessive smoothing of data. Origin Pro is also recommended for plotting data with error bars. Please be aware that the figure requirements for initial online submission (peer review) and for reproduction in the journal are now the same. Authors should now supply final high-resolution .tif or .eps files for reproduction in the journal at the time of submission. Figure legends should be typed separately from the figures and placed in the main text document.

These should be submitted in the desired final printed size so that reduction can be avoided. Ideally figures should fit either a single or a double column. Images should be of sufficiently high quality with respect to detail, contrast, and fineness of grain to withstand the inevitable loss of contrast and detail inherent in the printing process. Image resolution should be a minimum of 300 dpi.

All supplementary figures and supplementary figure legends must be separate from the main document file.

Additional clarification on figures and tables can be found here.

Color Figures

The cost of printing color figures is £350/US$600/€525 per figure. Please submit figures for printing in color only if you agree to the color charge. Black & white figures may not be substituted for color figures after a manuscript has been reviewed and accepted. Authors of accepted manuscripts containing color figures in print will be obligated to pay the color figure charges. Authors ordering offprints of articles that contain color figures will incur an additional charge for color reproduction. If you ticked the color charge approval box in ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission site for the journal, you will incur color figure charges. Orders from the UK will be subject to the current UK VAT charge. For orders from elsewhere in the EU, you or your institution should account for VAT by way of a reverse charge. Please provide us with your or your institution’s VAT number.

Alternatively, figures can be printed in black and white in the printed journal but in color online only.

REFERENCES

Reference list

  • References should be listed at the end of the main text.
  • Text references. Number references in the text in the order in which they appear. Use arabic numbers in parentheses, not superscripts.
  • Authors should check all references carefully, and in particular ensure that all references in the Reference section are cited in the text.
  • Personal communications, unpublished results, manuscripts submitted or in preparation, statistical packages, computer programs and web sites should be cited in the text only, NOT included in the References section.
  • Accession numbers may be cited either within the text or in the form of a reference. The normal form of listed references is author's surname, initials; article title; journal name in full, year in parenthesis; volume number and inclusive page numbers.
  • Include titles with all journal articles. In addition, if you are citing a work listed as "In Press", please provide a copy of that work with your submitted manuscript.

Examples

Journal article (already published in an issue):Vanatta, L.E., Slingsby, R.W.; United States Environmental perchlorate Method 332.0 via microbore and capillary chromatographic formats; Journal of Chromatographic Science, (2009); 47: 1-7.

Journals article (e-pub ahead of print): Fling, B.W.; Fundamental differences in callosal structure, neurophysiologic function, and bimanual control in young and older adults; Cerebral Cortex, December 12, 2011: 10.1093/cercor/bhr349

Chapter in a book: Ahuja, S.; Perspectives on evaluation of steroisomers as drug candidates. In Chiral separations by chromatography, 1st edition, Chapter 2. Oxford University Press, New York, NY, (2000), pp. 15-37.

Book (Editor as author): Striegel, A. (ed). Multiple Detection in Size-Exclusion Chromatography. Oxford University Press, New York, NY, (2004), pp. 5-17.

Number of authors: Single author: Shaw, S.
Two authors: Kennedy, T. and Jones, R.
More than two authors: Zerjal, T., Singh, L. and Thangaraj, Jr K.

Electronic source: : EPA. (2006) US Outdoor Water Use. Water Sense. http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/pubs/outdoor.html (accessed October 18, 2010).

Page Charges

There are no page charges.

PROOFS

Authors are sent page proofs. Please provide an email address to enable page proofs to be sent as PDF files via email. To avoid delays in publication, proofs should be checked immediately for typographical errors. Final page proofs are not customarily sent to the authors. Responsibility for accuracy of the published manuscript lies solely with the author.

LICENSE TO PUBLISH/ OFFPRINTS

Upon receipt of accepted manuscripts at Oxford Journals authors will be invited to complete an online copyright license to publish form.

This ensures that requests from third parties to reproduce articles are handled efficiently and consistently and will also allow the article to be as widely disseminated as possible. In granting an exclusive license, authors may use their own material in publications provided that the Journal is acknowledged as the original place of publication, and Oxford University Press is notified in writing and in advance. In consideration for granting an exclusive license, the publisher will provide free online access to your article. Printed offprints may be ordered at extra cost at the proof stage.

To download the offprint form, please click here.

Orders from the UK will be subject to the current UK VAT charge. For orders from elsewhere in the EU you or your institution should account for VAT by way of a reverse charge. Please provide us with your or your institution’s VAT number.

Please note that by submitting an article for publication you confirm that you are the corresponding/submitting author and that Oxford University Press ("OUP") may retain your email address for the purpose of communicating with you about the article. You agree to notify OUP immediately if your details change. If your article is accepted for publication OUP will contact you using the email address you have used in the registration process. Please note that OUP does not retain copies of rejected articles.

OPEN ACCESS OPTION FOR AUTHORS

Journal of Chromatographic Science authors have the option to publish their paper under the Oxford Open initiative; whereby, for a charge, their paper will be made freely available online immediately upon publication. After your manuscript is accepted the corresponding author will be required to accept a mandatory license to publish agreement. As part of the licensing process you will be asked to indicate whether or not you wish to pay for open access. If you do not select the open access option, your paper will be published with standard subscription-based access and you will not be charged.

Oxford Open articles are published under Creative Commons licences. Authors publishing in The Journal of Chromatographic Science can use the following Creative Commons licence for their articles:
• Creative Commons Non-Commercial licence (CC-BY-NC)

Please click here for more information about the Creative Commons licenses.

You can pay Open Access charges using our Author Services site. This will enable you to pay online with a credit/debit card, or request an invoice by email or post. The open access charges applicable are:

Regular charge - £1875/ $3000 / €2437
List B Developing country charge* - £938 / $1500 / €1219
List A Developing country charge* - £0 /$0 / €0
*Visit our developing countries page (click here for a list of qualifying countries.)

Please note that these charges are in addition to any colour/page charges that may apply.

Orders from the UK will be subject to the current UK VAT charge. For orders from the rest of the European Union, OUP will assume that the service is provided for business purposes. Please provide a VAT number for yourself or your institution and ensure you account for your own local VAT correctly.

FUNDING

Please submit a separate title page (to be designated as “Title Page”) with author address and contact details, funding sources, word count and any acknowledgements.

For the funding statement the following rules should be followed:

  • The sentence should begin: ‘This work was supported by …’
  • The full official funding agency name should be given, i.e. ‘the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health’ or simply 'National Institutes of Health' not ‘NCI' (one of the 27 subinstitutions) or 'NCI at NIH’ (full RIN-approved list of UK funding agencies) Grant numbers should be complete and accurate and provided in brackets as follows: ‘[grant number ABX CDXXXXXX]’
  • Multiple grant numbers should be separated by a comma as follows: ‘[grant numbers ABX CDXXXXXX, EFX GHXXXXXX]’
  • Agencies should be separated by a semi-colon (plus ‘and’ before the last funding agency)
  • Where individuals need to be specified for certain sources of funding the following text should be added after the relevant agency or grant number 'to [author initials]'.
  • An example is given here: ‘This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [AA123456 to C.S., BB765432 to M.H.]; and the Alcohol & Education Research Council [P50 CA098252 and CA118790 to R.B.S.R.].’

Oxford Journals will deposit all NIH-funded articles in PubMed Central. See here for details. Authors must ensure that manuscripts are clearly indicated as NIH-funded using the guidelines above.

Author Self-Archiving/Public Access policy

For information about this journal's policy, please visit our Author Self-Archiving policy page.

COMMUNICATIONS

Correspondence should be directed to: jcs.editorialoffice@oup.com

LANGUAGE

Particularly if English is not your first language, before submitting your manuscript you may wish to have it edited for language. This is not a mandatory step, but may help to ensure that the academic content of your paper is fully understood by journal editors and reviewers. Language editing does not guarantee that your manuscript will be accepted for publication. If you would like information about one such service please click here. There are other specialist language editing companies that offer similar services and you can also use any of these. Authors are liable for all costs associated with such services.