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Instructions to Authors

Conservation Physiology is fully open access - publication fees are waived for the initial launch period.

SUBMISSION

Please read these instructions carefully and follow them closely to ensure that the review and publication of your paper is as efficient as possible. The Editors reserve the right to return manuscripts that are not in accordance with these instructions.
All material to be considered for publication in Conservation Physiology should be submitted in electronic form via the journal's online submission system.

HOW TO CONTACT THE EDITORIAL OFFICE

The Editorial Office can be contacted at conphys.editorialoffice@oup.com

ARTICLE TYPES

Conservation Physiology accepts the following article types:

Research Articles - Papers that report on original empirical research based on observation, experimentation and/or modeling (typically 3000 to 6000 words)

The Tool Box - Papers that report on advances in techniques or methods that expand and improve the conservation physiology tool box in the lab or field (typically 3000 to 4000 words)

Reviews - Comprehensive reviews that synthesize a given topic related to conservation physiology (typically 6000 to 10000 words)

Perspectives - Persuasive essays or viewpoints with a particular focus on fostering conceptual, theoretical or practical (e.g., policy, management, conservation, modeling) advances in conservation physiology (typically 2000 to 4000 words)

Comments - Papers that critique or respond to material previously published in the journal (typically 1000 words)

Word limits are provided as guidelines and are intended to be inclusive of text from the entire paper except for the references and tables. In instances where the length of a paper deviates significantly from the guidelines the authors should contact the Editor-in-Chief for guidance prior to submission. At times the editorial team will solicit invited reviews or perspectives. Because the journal is online only we encourage authors to consider use of colour figures and photographs where it adds clarity or impact to the paper. All manuscripts are subject to peer review. Comments should be submitted within 6 months of publication for a given article and will be reviewed by members of the editorial board. If deemed of sufficient merit, authors of the initial article will be provided the opportunity to respond to the critiques in a companion paper.

MANUSCRIPT FORMAT AND STRUCTURE

Please prepare your typescript text using a word-processing package (save in .doc or .rtf format). Typescripts should be double-spaced. Please number each page.
Please note that while we accept LaTeX files for this journal, this is not the preferred format and the files will not be processed in a LaTeX environment.

Authors should upload a single file containing the complete manuscript (i.e. title page, abstract, text, figures and tables), as this makes the reviewing process easier for Editors and referees. This applies to the original version of the manuscript and any revised versions. Due to figure file size constraints, you may have to submit separate files for figures. The location of Tables and Figures should be indicated in the text.

Please also include the files for any other supplementary material to be submitted with your manuscript. It is recommended that authors spell-check all files before submission.

Please use short, simple filenames when saving all your documents, and avoid special characters, punctuation marks, symbols (such as &), and spaces. If you are a Macintosh user, you must also type the extension at the end of the file name you choose (.doc, .rtf, .jpg, .gif, .tif, .xls, .pdf, .eps, .ppt, .mov or .qt).

Other helpful hints are: (i) use the TAB key once for paragraph indents; (ii) where possible use Times New Roman for the text font and Symbol for any Greek and special characters; (iii) use the word processing formatting features to indicate Bold, Italic, Greek, Maths, Superscript and Subscript characters; (iv) please avoid using underline: for cases use italic; for emphasis use bold; (v) clearly identify unusual symbols and Greek letters; (vi) differentiate between the letter O and zero, and the letters I and l and the number 1.

The first page of the manuscript must give: title of paper, contributor names, and the full address (including email) of the author designated to receive proofs/correspondence, the lay summary and total word count.

The name of the author(s) should appear at the beginning immediately under the title, with an asterisked footnote giving the present position of the author(s) and an address (including email) for contact by readers, together with any desired acknowledgements.

An abstract of no more than 300 words should be included with all submissions.
Authors are responsible for checking the accuracy of all footnotes and references.

Lay summary

Please include a 50-word lay summary on the cover page of your manuscript. This will appear on the online table of contents and should give a brief snapshot of your paper.

Title page

The title should be short, specific and informative. The first name, initial(s), and surname of each author should be followed by his or her department, institution, city with postcode, and country. The fax, telephone number and Email address of the corresponding author should also be provided. It is editorial policy to list only one author for correspondence. Any changes of address may be given next to the Affiliations or Acknowledgements.

A footnote clarifying individual author contributions is welcome. Any deletions or additions to the author list after acceptance of the paper must be submitted in writing, signed by all authors, to the appropriate editorial office. New sequence accession numbers (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank) should be listed on the title page.

It is important that authors ensure the following: (i) all names have the correct spelling and are in the correct order (first name, then family name); (ii) initials are correct. Occasionally, the distinction between surnames and forenames can be ambiguous, and this is to ensure that the authors’ full surnames and forenames are tagged correctly, for accurate indexing online.

Abstract

The second page of the manuscript should contain the Abstract, which must not exceed 300 words. The Abstract should be comprehensible to readers before they have read the paper, and reference citations must be avoided. It is essential that the Abstract clearly states the biological and conservation/management importance of the work described in the paper.

Abbreviations

Non-standard abbreviations should be defined at the first occurrence and introduced only where multiple use is made. Authors should not use abbreviations in headings.

Funding

Details of all funding sources for the work in question should be given in a separate section entitled 'Funding'. This should appear before the 'Acknowledgements' section.
The following rules should be followed:
• The sentence should begin: ‘This work was supported by …’
• The full official funding agency name should be given, i.e. ‘the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health’ or simply 'National Institutes of Health' not ‘NCI' (one of the 27 subinstitutions) or 'NCI at NIH’ (full RIN-approved list of UK funding agencies)
• Grant numbers should be complete and accurate and provided in brackets as follows: ‘[grant number ABX CDXXXXXX]’
• Multiple grant numbers should be separated by a comma as follows: ‘[grant numbers ABX CDXXXXXX, EFX GHXXXXXX]’
• Agencies should be separated by a semi-colon (plus ‘and’ before the last funding agency)
• Where individuals need to be specified for certain sources of funding the following text should be added after the relevant agency or grant number 'to [author initials]'.
An example is given here: ‘This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [P50 CA098252 and CA118790 to R.B.S.R.] and the Alcohol & Education Research Council [HFY GR667789].

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements and details of non-financial support must be included at the end of the text before references and not in footnotes. Personal acknowledgements should precede those of institutions or agencies. Please note that acknowledgement of funding bodies and declarations regarding conflicts of interest should be given in separate Funding and Conflicts of interest sections, respectively.

References

Download Conservation Physiology Endnote Output Style.

The accuracy of the references and citation information is the responsibility of the authors. Please be aware that, if citation information is incomplete or inaccurate, links on the online journal will not work. Line numbering should be omitted from the References section onwards.

Citations in the text should have the authors immediately followed by the date to facilitate the electronic linkages which are available on-line, for example: (Shen and Ma, 2001) or Shen and Ma (2001). If several papers by the same author in the same year are cited, they should be lettered in sequence (2000a, b), etc. When papers are by more than two authors they should be cited in the text: (Shen et al., 2001).

In the list, references must be placed in alphabetical order without serial numbering. The list of literature must be typed at 1.5 line spaces and no space between citations. References should be thoroughly checked before submission. If the list is not in the correct form it will be returned to the author for amendment and publication of the paper may be delayed. For a paper with up to 10 authors, list them all; for more than 10 authors, list the first ten followed by et al. Journal titles should be abbreviated.

The following standard form of citation should be used, including the title of each paper or book:
• Journal articles: Cooke SJ, Hinch SG, Donaldson MR, Clark TD, Eliason EJ, Crossin GT, Raby GD, Jeffries KM, Lapointe M, Miller K, et al. (2012) Conservation physiology in practice: how physiological knowledge has improved our ability to sustainably manage Pacific salmon during up-river migration. Philos Trans R Soc B Biol Sci 367:1757-1769.
• Online journal articles:
Rand PS, Goslin M (2012) Global assessment of extinction risk to populations of Sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. PLoS One 7, e34065. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034065.
• Books:
He P (2010) Behavior of Marine Fishes: Capture Processes and Conservation Challenges. Willey-Blackwell, Amsterdam, pp 14-19.
• Chapters:
Gardiner J, Hueter R (2012) Sensory Physiology and Behavior of Elasmobranchs. In: Carrier J, Musick J, eds. Biology of Sharks and Their Relatives, Second Edition. CRC Press, Boca Raton, pp 349-401.
• Websites:
IUCN (2012) The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. http://www.iucnredlist.org. (last accessed 1 December 2012).

The authors’ own unpublished work and personal communications from other investigators should be cited in the text, not in the reference list. For example:
“… we are aware (our unpublished work) that …”
or
“… we are aware (personal communication from Dr xxx, University of xxx) that …”

Tables


All tables should be on separate pages and accompanied by a title, and footnotes where necessary. The tables should be numbered consecutively using Arabic numerals. Units in which results are expressed should be given in parentheses at the top of each column and not repeated in each line of the table. Ditto signs are not used. Avoid overcrowding the tables and the excessive use of words. The format of tables should be in keeping with that normally used by the journal; in particular, vertical lines, coloured text and shading should not be used. Please be certain that the data given in tables are correct.

FIGURES AND ILLUSTRATIONS

Because the journal is online only we encourage authors to consider use of colour figures and photographs where it adds clarity or impact to the paper.

Please be aware that the requirements for online submission and for reproduction in the journal are different: (i) for online submission and peer review, please upload your figures either embedded in the word processing file or separately as low-resolution images (.jpg, .tif, .gif or. eps); (ii) for reproduction in the journal, you will be required after acceptance to supply high-resolution .tif files. Minimum resolutions are 300 d.p.i. for colour or tone images, and 600 d.p.i. for line drawings. We advise that you create your high-resolution images first as these can be easily converted into low-resolution images for online submission.

Figures will not be relettered by the publisher. The journal reserves the right to reduce the size of illustrative material. Any photomicrographs, electron micrographs or radiographs must be of high quality. Wherever possible, photographs should fit within the print area or within a column width. Photomicrographs should provide details of staining technique and a scale bar.

When creating figures, please make sure any embedded text is large enough to read. Many figures contain miniscule characters such as numbers on a chart or graph. If these characters are not easily readable, they will most likely be illegible in the final version. Certain image formats such as .jpg and .gif do not have high resolutions, so you may elect to save your figures and insert them as .tif instead.

For useful information on preparing your figures for publication, go to http://cpc.cadmus.com/da.

PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE FIGURES AND EXTRACTS

Permission to reproduce copyright material, for print and online publication in perpetuity, must be cleared and if necessary paid for by the author; this includes applications and payments to DACS, ARS and similar licensing agencies where appropriate. Evidence in writing that such permissions have been secured from the rights-holder must be made available to the editors. It is also the author's responsibility to include acknowledgements as stipulated by the particular institutions. Please note that obtaining copyright permission could take some time. Oxford Journals can offer information and documentation to assist authors in securing print and online permissions: please see the Guidelines for Authors section at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/access_purchase/rights_permissions.html. Should you require copies of this then please contact the Oxford Journals Rights department.

For a copyright prose work, it is recommended that permission is obtained for the use of extracts longer than 400 words; a series of extracts totalling more than 800 words, of which any one extract is more than 300 words; or an extract or series of extracts comprising one-quarter of the work or more.

SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

Supporting material that is not essential for inclusion in the full text of the manuscript, but would nevertheless benefit the reader, can be made available by the publisher as online-only content, linked to the online manuscript. The material should not be essential to understanding the conclusions of the paper, but should contain data that is additional or complementary and directly relevant to the article content. Such information might include more detailed methods, extended data sets/data analysis, or additional figures.
It is standard practice for appendices to be made available online-only as supplementary data. All text and figures must be provided in suitable electronic formats. All material to be considered as supplementary data must be submitted at the same time as the main manuscript for peer review. It cannot be altered or replaced after the paper has been accepted for publication, and will not be edited. Please indicate clearly all material intended as supplementary data upon submission and name the files e.g. 'Supplementary Figure 1', 'Supplementary Data', etc. Also ensure that the supplementary data is referred to in the main manuscript where necessary, for example as '(see Supplementary data)' or '(see Supplementary Figure 1)'.

COPYRIGHT AND LICENCE

Upon receipt of accepted manuscripts at Oxford Journals authors will be invited to complete an online copyright licence to publish form.

Conservation Physiology authors have the option to publish their paper under the Oxford Open initiative; whereby their paper will be made freely available online immediately upon publication. This is currently free of charge.

Oxford Open articles are published under Creative Commons licences. Authors publishing in Conservation Physiology can use the Creative Commons Attribution licence (CC-BY). Please click here for more information about the Creative Commons licences.

Please note that by submitting an article for publication you confirm that you are the corresponding/submitting author and that Oxford University Press ("OUP") may retain your email address for the purpose of communicating with you about the article. You agree to notify OUP immediately if your details change. If your article is accepted for publication OUP will contact you using the email address you have used in the registration process. Please note that OUP does not retain copies of rejected articles.

PROOFS

Authors are sent page proofs by email. These should be checked immediately and corrections, as well as answers to any queries, returned to the publishers as an annotated PDF via email or fax within 3 working days (further details are supplied with the proof). It is the author's responsibility to check proofs thoroughly.

PUBLICATION

After typesetting, editing, and proof correction, articles are immediately published in an online issue and this constitutes official publication. Once published, articles can be cited using the volume and doi number, e.g. Milenkaya O, Weinstein N, Legge S, Walters JR (2013) Variation in body condition indices of crimson finches by sex, breeding stage, age, time of day, and year. Conserv Physiol 1: doi:10.1093/conphys/cot020.

LANGUAGE EDITING PRE-SUBMISSION

Language editing, if your first language is not English, to ensure that the academic content of your paper is fully understood by journal editors and reviewers, is optional. Language editing does not guarantee that your manuscript will be accepted for publication. For further information on this service, please click here. Several specialist language editing companies offer similar services and you can also use any of these. Authors are liable for all costs associated with such services. OUP offers pre-submission language editing through Oxford Language Editing, a service for researchers all over the world. Language editing, particularly if English is not your first language, can be used to ensure that the academic content of your paper is fully understood by the journal editors and reviewers. Visit www.oxfordlanguageediting.com to find out more about the freelance editors available and the different services offered. Please note that edited manuscripts will still need to undergo peer-review by the journal.

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Editor-in-Chief

Steven Cooke

For Authors

This journal enables compliance with the Wellcome and NIH Public Access Policies.

All content is open access under the terms of the
CC-BY licence.

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