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Special Issues

2013 Special Issue

The role of international criminal justice in transitional justice
Guest edited by Naomi Roht-Arriaza, Professor of Law at the University of California, Hastings College of Law.

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2012 Special Issue

Transitional Justice and the Everyday


The 2012 special issue from International Journal of Transitional Justice (IJTJ), entitled "Transitional Justice and the Everyday: Micro-perspectives of justice and social repair", is guest edited by Pilar Riaño Alcalá (Associate Professor, School of Social Work and Liu Institute for Global Studies, University of British Columbia) and Erin Baines (Assistant Professor, Liu Institute for Global Issues, University of British Columbia).

Editorial Note
Pilar Riaño Alcalá and Erin Baines

Multiple Temporalities in Indigenous Justice and Healing Practices in Mozambique
Victor Igreja

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2011 Special Issue

Civil Society, Social Movements and Transitional Justice

November 2011 (5:3)
Guest editors: Lucy Hovil and Moses Chrispus Okello
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"Are civil society actors genuinely inclusive, exerting a democratizing effect, or are they meddlers, distorting what is taking place and promoting a biased agenda? How do they ensure citizen inclusion? Who is setting the agenda? Are they offering counsel, or are they simply imposing external models onto complex cultural and political environments that are poorly understood? And from where do they derive their legitimacy? Given that transitional justice civil society activity has proliferated and remains relatively unmonitored, it is vital that we ask these questions." - Lucy Hovil and Moses Chrispus Okello

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Previous special issues

Transitional Justice on Trial - Evaluating Its Impact
November 2010 (4:3)
Guest editor: Colleen Duggan
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"In this special issue of the International Journal of Transitional Justice, which we have entitled ‘Transitional Justice on Trial: Evaluating Its Impact,’ we will delve more deeply into the question of how the field might be evaluated and what constitutes good evidence in transitional justice research and practice." - Colleen Duggan

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Whose Justice? Global and Local Approaches to Transitional Justice
November 2009 (3:3)
Guest editor: Kimberly Theidon
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"From Ecuador to Sri Lanka; from Greensboro, South Carolina to Australia; from South Korea to Colombia, transitional justice mechanisms and discourses have achieved a global presence. Truth commissions, trials, tribunals, apologies, lustration, reparations, reconciliation: while the precise combination varies, transitional justice processes have become an increasingly normative component of contemporary politics and regime change." - Kimberly Theidon

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Transitional Justice and Development
December 2008 (2:3)
Guest Editor: Rama Mani
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"This volume is divided into three sections. The first, theoretical and comparative, argues through its four articles for an expansion of the TJ field. The second is a case study section in which we focus on the new and emerging transitional justice and state-building processes in Nepal. The third section is ‘Notes from the Field,’ which presents two fascinating vignettes, including a reflection on a TJ and development conference and a field survey on the intersection of the same two fields." - Rama Mani

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Gender and Transitional Justice
December 2007 (1:3)
Guest Editor: Navanethem Pillay
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"This issue is devoted to gender and transitional justice. As you will see from the papers submitted, the authors present critical evaluations, confront myths and failures, advance alternative approaches, move beyond the focus of prosecution of rape to a more comprehensive understanding of redress. The papers move us away from ‘women as victims’ to a recognition of gender dimensions and a broader role for women as strategists and decision makers. The contributions are from experts and researchers as well as from experience on the ground. The commentaries have resonance to many contexts." - Navanethem Pillay

Read the full editorial note here.